Imallover

rollsoffthetongue:

What’s so funny about this? This joke is actually an APHORISM,a clever thought or idea, spoken or written, which has a general truth in it and is somewhat funny. Think about it, you can’t really argue with what the joke says, can you? Every time the subject of exercise or weight loss comes up, someone is bound to recommend swimming. There can be little doubt that if you swim a lot, you will burn a lot of calories, use up a lot of energy, and if you do enough swimming, you should lose weight. If you don’t eat like a horse to make up for the lost energy, you will keep the weight off. One of the main reasons people want to lose weight is because they are too fat or they think they are too fat and have too much fat on their bodies. This gives them a round, flabby body, or figure. Women want their curves to show, not be filled in. Men want their muscles defined, with big shoulders and narrow hips. These are ideal images, of course, but it’s what people strive for when they diet and exercise. That’s where the swimming comes in. BUT, as the joke points out, there is some evidence that not all swimming is good for your figure. That evidence is the largest creature that ever lived, the whale. Blue whales are bigger than the largest dinosaur and any other animal that ever existed. Whales live in the ocean and spend their lives swimming. The joke argues that whales are huge, hulking creatures and not curved like coca-cola bottle shaped women nor broad shouldered triangular shaped men. So why spend all that time swimming if you’re just going to end up like some enormous beast? And THAT’s what’s so funny!


Listen to my audioboo  https://audioboo.fm/boos/2459756-size-matters

rollsoffthetongue:

What’s so funny about this? This joke is actually an APHORISM,a clever thought or idea, spoken or written, which has a general truth in it and is somewhat funny. Think about it, you can’t really argue with what the joke says, can you? Every time the subject of exercise or weight loss comes up, someone is bound to recommend swimming. There can be little doubt that if you swim a lot, you will burn a lot of calories, use up a lot of energy, and if you do enough swimming, you should lose weight. If you don’t eat like a horse to make up for the lost energy, you will keep the weight off. One of the main reasons people want to lose weight is because they are too fat or they think they are too fat and have too much fat on their bodies. This gives them a round, flabby body, or figure. Women want their curves to show, not be filled in. Men want their muscles defined, with big shoulders and narrow hips. These are ideal images, of course, but it’s what people strive for when they diet and exercise. That’s where the swimming comes in. BUT, as the joke points out, there is some evidence that not all swimming is good for your figure. That evidence is the largest creature that ever lived, the whale. Blue whales are bigger than the largest dinosaur and any other animal that ever existed. Whales live in the ocean and spend their lives swimming. The joke argues that whales are huge, hulking creatures and not curved like coca-cola bottle shaped women nor broad shouldered triangular shaped men. So why spend all that time swimming if you’re just going to end up like some enormous beast? And THAT’s what’s so funny!

Listen to my audioboo  https://audioboo.fm/boos/2459756-size-matters

vintagegal:

William Claxton - “Audreys” Hot dog stand, Los Angeles, 3 am, 1961 (via)

vintagegal:

William Claxton - “Audreys” Hot dog stand, Los Angeles, 3 am, 1961 (via)

hyperallergic:

(via John Yau and Justine Kurland Discuss the Relationship of Photography, Poetry, and Narrative)
The following email exchange with the photographer Justine Kurland focuses on her exhibition, Sincere Auto Care, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash (September 4 – October 11, 2014), which is accompanied by a self-published book with the same title. While Justine was putting together the book, I sent her a poem that I thought had something to do with the images she had sent me to look at. Before I sent her the poem I mentioned the possibility of doing an interview. She agreed to this format as long as she also could ask me questions. This is the result.
READ MORE

hyperallergic:

(via John Yau and Justine Kurland Discuss the Relationship of Photography, Poetry, and Narrative)

The following email exchange with the photographer Justine Kurland focuses on her exhibition, Sincere Auto Care, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash (September 4 – October 11, 2014), which is accompanied by a self-published book with the same title. While Justine was putting together the book, I sent her a poem that I thought had something to do with the images she had sent me to look at. Before I sent her the poem I mentioned the possibility of doing an interview. She agreed to this format as long as she also could ask me questions. This is the result.

READ MORE