Imallover

hyperallergic:

(via How a Turn-of-the-Century Painter Influenced Military Camouflage)
The newest exhibition at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York examines the influence of nature on military camouflage. One object included in Masters of Disguise: The World of Camouflage is Concealing-Coloration in the Animal Kingdom, a 1909 book by a father-son team, with the father being one of the early 20th century’s prominent American artists.
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hyperallergic:

(via How a Turn-of-the-Century Painter Influenced Military Camouflage)

The newest exhibition at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York examines the influence of nature on military camouflage. One object included in Masters of Disguise: The World of Camouflage is Concealing-Coloration in the Animal Kingdom, a 1909 book by a father-son team, with the father being one of the early 20th century’s prominent American artists.

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feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

(via vintagegal)

softgardening:

Gallery Roundup: 10 Gardens at Water’s Edge by Barbara Peck

softgardening:

Gallery Roundup: 10 Gardens at Water’s Edge by Barbara Peck

mothernaturenetwork:

You’d think a beagle rescued from a testing lab might not make a great pet (but you’d be so wrong)Melanie Kaplan’s rescued beagle, Alexander Hamilton, is different from most rescued dogs. He wasn’t found wandering the streets or adopted from an animal shelter. Hamilton, or “Hammy” for short, was rescued from a laboratory where experiments are conducted on animals — a lab funded by taxpayer money.Hamilton is one of the DC7, seven beagles freed from a Washington-area lab last year by the Beagle Freedom Project, a nonprofit that works to release dogs used in research.Read more.

mothernaturenetwork:

You’d think a beagle rescued from a testing lab might not make a great pet (but you’d be so wrong)
Melanie Kaplan’s rescued beagle, Alexander Hamilton, is different from most rescued dogs. He wasn’t found wandering the streets or adopted from an animal shelter.
 
Hamilton, or “Hammy” for short, was rescued from a laboratory where experiments are conducted on animals — a lab funded by taxpayer money.

Hamilton is one of the DC7, seven beagles freed from a Washington-area lab last year by the Beagle Freedom Project, a nonprofit that works to release dogs used in research.

Read more.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)